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Back To School Parent Communication

August 28, 2020

Dear Families,

We are excited to be standing on the threshold of another school year!  As we scrub our campuses, mark the floors for appropriate social distancing, and streamline our At-Home Learning efforts, all of us here at NSCS can emphatically say, “We can’t wait for school!”

School provides a healthy rhythm in the week for both children and parents.  It sets the tone for what needs to be accomplished in a day.  Patterns, routines, and expectations are among the healthiest things we can provide our children.  It builds confidence and sets the mind at ease to know that life is somewhat normal and predictable.  And so, whether your child will be joining us from their living room, or from the classroom, we believe that God has called each family who has enrolled their child at North Shore Christian School, and we celebrate every family, be it our returning families or new ones.  All are welcome!

As we prepare to open our school doors, please take time to read through this letter that contains important information, as well as the additional information that can be found by accessing the link below. This link contains  information that you will need for the start of the school year, such as Dress Code Policies, Drop-off/pick-up Procedures, PE T-shirt form and Supply  lists. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1yobhch7tt0HAKMnKdzVTMPTvwzdnUk88?usp=sharing

If you have not completed the required Risk Waiver form you may access it by using the following link. https://forms.gle/iwWWukXuX9hY7rEs6

NSCS builds its annual plans, programming, and budget primarily around our enrollment numbers.  We are a tuition-driven school.  That means your commitment is vital to the excellent work that takes place here.  With that said, we did relax our deposit policy for a brief period of time this summer while many families sought to figure out their school plans for the fall.  Our policy clearly indicates that deposits are non-refundable and that enrollment contracts are in full force for the entire school year after July 1st.  Due to the uncertainties of COVID, we extended this deadline to September 1st, so that families who had re-enrolled or recently enrolled could have additional time to solidify their plans for the fall.

What does all this mean?  Come September 1, 2020 your deposit will be non-refundable and you will be obliged to pay the remainder of your child’s tuition for the Academic Year 2020/21*.  We know that COVID-19 makes it extremely difficult to make plans with any measure of guarantee.  With that said, NSCS has committed to the education of your child this year, be it in the classroom or at home, and we have made staffing decisions based upon your child’s enrollment and we are excited to set this partnership in motion during the first week of school beginning on September 21, 2020.  Should you need support around enrollment please reach out to Christine Saia at csaia@nschristian.org.

As way of reminder regarding the use of masks while at school, all students in grades 1 though 8 will be required to wear a mask.  Students in grades Preschool through Kindergarten may wear a mask if you so choose.  We will fully support your decision either way.  All of our faculty and staff will be required to wear masks, as will any adult who enters our buildings.

Students wearing masks must wear either a 3-ply disposable masks, or a fabric mask that is at least two layers.  Reusable masks must be washed daily.  There will be ample mask breaks, and as we safely social distances outside and engage in learning there will be even greater opportunity for mask breaks.

Our Parent Teacher Fellowship (PTF) will be selling both child and adult-sized masks with the school logo on them, and we are excited to make these available for purchase in the coming weeks.  Be on the lookout for more information!

Additionally, Mrs. Lowe, our Lead Principal, will be working with our teachers to provide a time prior to the first day of school, for you and your child to visit and see some of the creative ways we are preparing for a school year that includes the reality of COVID.  Our teachers have gotten pretty creative!  I am sure you will be pleasantly surprised by the ways in which they have sought to keep the classrooms kid friendly, while respecting the Virus. Be on lookout!

Finally, for some of our families the attached Student Supply List may be a new concept.  This year we have made the decision that all students, grades Preschool through 8 will bring in their own student supplies, so that we can limit cross contamination by not having general student supplies in the classroom.  NSCS will be supplying the pencil boxes for each grade, so that school supplies can be easily labeled, stored, and washed and our middle school students can easily tote their supplies from classroom to classroom.  A portion of your child’s Annual Student Fee this year will be used to help alleviate the expense of additional PPE (Personal Protective Equipment).

As we each wind down our summer, might I just say what a joy it has been to be back on our three campuses.  Our faculty and staff are eager…very eager to see your children.  As we have been praying for all our families and our efforts here at school, please continue to pray along with us that God will bless the work of our hands as we continue preparing to receive your children for an exciting year of learning and growing together!

With Love and Thanksgiving,

Pam Heintz, Head of School

 

* Should an extended school closure be mandated due to COVID-19, and NSCS is required to move toward an At-Home Learning model temporarily, special accommodations in regards to the enrollment agreement will be given to those families enrolled in our Early Childhood Education program.

March 12, 2020 COVID-19 Letter from HOS

Dear NSCS Families,

I want to keep you all apprised of recent decisions and considerations that have been made by the Board and Administration.  Please keep in mind that the COVID-19 pandemic is dynamic, and things can change hour-to-hour, so please check your email frequently for updates.

As of Thursday evening, March 12th, all three of our campuses will remain open tomorrow, March 13th.  Tomorrow the administration, along with Board approval, will make a decision as to future school closings, and we will inform families either by Friday night or Saturday morning of our decision via email.

With that said, teachers will be sending school-work home tomorrow with students in grades K through 8.  This work will be enough for about two-weeks.  NO DECSION has been made yet about a school closure, however, should one be made over the weekend we want to be prepared.  Additionally, any parent/guardian who desires to keep their child/ren home from school tomorrow, or at any time during the pandemic, may do so without having the absence recorded on their child/ren’s school records.  All absences will be considered excused.

As always, please never hesitate to reach out to me at pheintz@nschristian.org with any questions or concerns you might have.  We are all committed to working through this together as we mutually support each other’s efforts.  This is a difficult time for all of us we navigate a situation that has no script.  However, we move forward trusting that God is in control.

Below is a letter that I had written to all our families this morning, with the intention of emailing it out by noon today, but my day ended up holding many distractions and conversations around this pandemic.  I have decided to send it out anyhow hoping that it will prove to be a source of encouragement to you.

With Blessings,

Pam Heintz, Head of School

——————————————————————–

Letter to Families- March 12, 2020

Dear Families,

I was driving to school today and feeling a bit scared.  There, I’ve admitted it.  I was feeling scared, insecure and uncertain.  I was tired of turning on the radio or TV and hearing about the Corona Virus and its far-reaching effects, its unknowns, and the chaos it seems to evoke.  I was feeling like the whole world had gone mad!

As is my routine to pray during my commute to work, I said a quick token prayer out of obligation.  I asked God to bless and protect my family, our school, and the country, and then I said, amen.  Following this prayer, I immediately turned the radio on to hear the news, and learn about what might have changed in the past three minutes since I last tuned in.   As I listened my mind traveled to all the what-ifs.  Letting one’s mind travel to the what-ifs is always a dangerous place to go.

I arrived to our Beverly Campus and Chapel soon started. I really wasn’t up for Chapel today.  Please don’t judge meJ  It was simply that my head was filled with other thoughts and distractions.  I was self-focused thinking about how I needed to manage things at school and at home in the midst of a pandemic.  As I walked into Chapel my spirit immediately soared. Our Student Worship Team was already singing, and what a melodious sound it was!  I took my place and stood in a pew with some older students, and was swept up in the moment of being present before the Lord.  As I looked around the room, I saw students worshipping a mighty God.  I witness children unabashedly singing out in confidence to their Savior.  Teary-eyed I asked God to forgive me for being so fearful and to fill me with His peace which passes all understanding.  I asked God to take my feet and plant them securely upon the rock, that is His Son Jesus.  I asked God to allow me to be a witness to those around, and especially during this time.

As I left Chapel, I felt uplifted and ready to face life’s challenges.  I soon stepped into a meeting with Christine Saia, our Director of Admissions.  We made small talk, which included a brief conversation about the Corona Virus, as every conversation these past several days has.  Mrs. Saia shared with me that while she was praying with her own children this morning, who had questions and concerns about the pandemic, the Holy Spirit spoke to her heart.   Mrs. Saia was able to share the most insightful and wonderful message with her children. She explained to them that the word corona is a Latin word meaning crown.  Mrs. Saia proceeded to tell her children that only our God wears a crown worthy enough for the King of kings.   She expressed that only our King has control over all things.

It is our crown-wearing King that holds all the whole world in the palm his hands, including the Corona Virus.  God knows all things and there is not one tiny microscopic germ that he does not have full authority over.  We can trust God with this pandemic and with all things.  He is a Faithful God.

I want to encourage you to remain calm and hopeful as we trust God to help us ride out this storm.  We have a tremendous opportunity to respond differently than the world.  We can respond with peace, and offer reassuring words to those around us, particularly to our children and students.

I was reminded today, that our students, even the younger ones, sense that something is amiss.  They are feeling the strain of what is going on right now in our world, and unlike adults, they have not fully grown into the capacity to layer what they hear with reason and logic.  As the adults in their lives we must be the voice of reason.  Some healthy behaviors that we can adopt at home, and around our children would be to limit the amount of news that children have access to.  While it is good for them to be aware of what is going on in the world, the content of information needs to be age-appropriate and monitored.  It is also good to connect regularly with your child/ren and asking them if they have specific concerns about the Corona Virus.  Consider making a family contingency plan in case there is a prolonged school closure, and reassure your child/ren that if you still have to go to work that they will be well-cared for by someone else during the day.  Remind your child/ren that they are safe at home and at school, because the adults at these places are doing all they can to make sure these environments are kept clean and safe.  Be sure that your child/ren receive plenty of sleep and maintain a healthy diet – these are good practices for healthy living!  Above all, spend time with your child/ren doing “normal” everyday things like, baking cookies, playing games, doing chores around the house, or reading a good book together.  Life must go on in spite of this pandemic and our children need to see the adults around them still engaging in every day affairs.

I have attached the lyrics to a song that our Student Worship Team sang today, and I encourage you to listen to it when you have the opportunity.  It is a powerful reminder that there is victory in Jesus!

With Love,

Pam Heintz, Head of School

See a Victory, Elevation Music

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNd-PbVhnvA

The weapon may be formed, but it won’t prosper
When the darkness falls, it won’t prevail
‘Cause the God I serve knows only how to triumph
My God will never fail
Oh, my God will never fail

I’m gonna see a victory
I’m gonna see a victory
For the battle belongs to You, Lord
I’m gonna see a victory
I’m gonna see a victory
For the battle belongs to You, Lord (oh yeah)

There’s power in the mighty name of Jesus
Every war He wages He will win
I’m not backing down from any giant
‘Cause I know how this story ends
Yes, I know how this story ends

I’m gonna see a victory
I’m gonna see a victory
For the battle belongs to You, Lord
I’m gonna see a victory
I’m gonna see a victory
For the battle belongs to You, Lord
I’m gonna see a victory
I’m gonna see a victory
For the battle…

 

March 11, 2020 COVID-19 Letter from HOS

Dear Families,
I wanted to provide an update for you all, and will do so periodically so that you will remain informed as to the measures NSCS is taking to ensure the continued safety and well-being of your children.

Our amazing faculty has committed themselves to faithfully disinfecting the hard surfaces of their classrooms each afternoon. Our custodial staff has also provided extra measures of cleaning and disinfecting to all our buildings. Teachers are also being vigilant about reminding students to cover their mouths and noses when they sneeze, with either a tissue or the crook of their arm, and then washing their hands for a minimum of 20 seconds. They are also providing ample opportunities for hand washing and/or usage of hand sanitizer throughout the school day.

Additionally, I have been in close communications with our Deans who are working closely with the faculty to ensure that an Academic Plan will be ready to execute should we encounter a prolonged school closing (week or more). This plan will be dynamic, and teachers have already begun to engage the process.

NSCS would like to encourage Parent support in these specific ways;

  1. Please do NOT send your child to school if they have a cough or runny nose. We want toremain extra vigilant during this especially difficult flu and virus season.
  1. Please do NOT send your child to school if they have been symptomatic with flu-likesymptoms, vomiting, or fever in the past 24 hours – they MUST be symptom free for at least24 hours before returning to school.
  1. If you feel lead to purchase hand sanitizer, tissues, rubber gloves, face masks, or hand soap that has disinfectant properties we would welcome these donations as we work to secure that we have an ample supply on hand at all times.
  1. If you have traveled within the US or abroad, please check with the Centers for DiseaseControl and Prevention to view information regarding travel bans and updates, precautions, and actions needed should you or family have traveled to areas that are consider at risk. You can find this information on their website at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices.
  1. Please continue pray for this global and dynamic situation. In times like this we have the blessed opportunity to interceded through prayer and press into Jesus. He is faithful all the time.

As is always the case, I am available should you have questions, concerns, or suggestions.

To God Be the Glory,

Pam Heintz, Head of School

 

History Fair

An Evening of Remaking History

By Liz MacDavitt, 3rd/4th grade teacher

On February 10, 2020 NSCS Beverly celebrated our students’ hard work at the History Fair. It was quite the celebration of what students have been learning this year, with projects representing “The History of Me” (K), “Famous Americans” (1/2), “Fifty Nifty States Parade of Floats” (3/4), “The Civil War” (5/6), and “Unsung Heroes of the American Revolution” (7). Students in all grades worked so hard to produce high quality projects and focused their in-class efforts on strong presentation skills. Parents, extended relatives, and friends enjoyed visiting each class’s displays and revelled in hearing from excited students. The following day, each class visited other classrooms to view each project. This year’s History Fair was a great success!

In 3rd & 4th grade, projects like the “Fifty Nifty States Parade of Floats” allow students to dig deeper into topics studied in class. Students have the freedom to learn more about people, places, and events in history while representing their newfound knowledge in creative and artistic ways. For this project, each student selected one of the 50 states and built a state float to represent important places, natural resources, landmarks, scenic attractions, agriculture, and historical events found in that state. These creative floats were accompanied by a one page essay on their state’s statehood process, or a well-known historical person/event in their state. To add to the fun of this project, students were awarded bonus points for dressing as a famous historical figure or sharing a popular food from their state. All of this hard work and creativity was celebrated the night of the History Fair! Their floats were amazing, eye-catching, unique, colorful, and accurate representations of 25 different states that make up this great country. I was so impressed!

Although projects like this are time consuming and may cause us as teachers to press pause on regularly planned lessons, they are important. Aside from teaching students more about history and their selected topic, this project taught students a great deal about time management as they followed a timeline of due dates, self-starting as they completed the majority of their research outside of the classroom, and that creative, artistic inspirations definitely have a place in the classroom. Some of the steps of this project were new and challenging to some students, but the end results were projects that had been completed carefully and with excellence. As a teacher, I love projects that allow students to display their learning in a variety of creative mediums, and it seems that so many students learn and remember more content when they are given the freedom to create and use their own talents and interests to enhance their schoolwork. This will forever be one of my favorite projects because I can see how seriously students take their research and how much they learn from it as a result. There are older students in this school who had done this project with me in 3rd & 4th grade who still talk about their state float and what they learned! This is a testament to their hard work and to the value of a well-done History Project at NSCS. 

For now, we’re back to regularly planned lessons, which are equally important, but do stay tuned for more creative and exciting projects before this year ends! 

 

Backyard Waterslide Engineering

By Dan Feins, Middle School Science

Engineers ask critical questions about what they want to create, whether it be a skyscraper, amusement park ride, bicycle or smartphone. These questions include: What is the problem to solve? What do we want to design? Who is it for? What do we want to accomplish? What are the project requirements? What are the limitations? What is our goal?

The seventh-grade class at the Beverly campus began an engineering unit in the New Year. After a very brief discussion, the class determined the problem to solve was how can we build a waterslide in our own backyard. Based on previous waterslide experiences, the students’ initial concept was to connect three or four “normal” plastic slides together, support those slides with wooden trusses, and have a long ladder to reach the top. Water would arrive at the top via a series of extension hoses and be deposited at the bottom into a pool.

Practical issues were discussed during the next class. The students were confronted with several issues, most of which involved physics and cost. For example, a person sitting at the top of a waterslide has inertia that they must overcome to start down the slide. Should the water give them a push, or should the person push themselves? Friction needed to be overcome on the way down the slide, and that required more water than could be achieved through a garden hose. And then there was cost. Although no budget had been set at this point, the team knew that money was not going to be unlimited.

Research commenced via Chromebooks. The team determined that a “trash hose” connected to a “trash water pump” would push the water up to the slide and then down the slide with enough pressure to move a person along. Cost comparisons were made in terms of buying or renting the trash water pump. The team leaned in the direction of renting because the waterslide would only be used for certain parts of the year, and even then, on certain days within those parts.

The team took some time to view videos of successful waterslides from around the world and from people’s backyards. The students were struck by one video which showed a backyard waterslide that was built on sloped ground, eliminating the need for plastic slides, a support structure, a ladder, and decreasing the size of trash water pump required. The team was introduced to the most critical aspect of engineering: it is an iterative process, meaning that we repeat the steps as many times as needed, making improvements along the way as we learn from failure and uncover new design possibilities to arrive at great solutions

At the next class meeting the old design was scrapped in favor of one that could be built along the ground and run down a hill. The students drafted up some designs and settled on a waterslide that twists and turns and would run the length of the hill, culminating in a shallow pool at the end. During the next class, with some students out due to illness, one of the students worked on their prototype. After several valiant attempts to construct a twisting and turning waterslide, it became evident that such a construction may not be possible for their prototype, given the materials at hand, and it may in fact be prohibitively difficult for full scale construction as well.

The next couple of classes the students turned their attention to building a linear waterslide. Tests of the waterslide were made using water from a pitcher poured down the slide from the top. The students quickly learned that creating a leak proof waterslide required a lot of work and attention to detail. But having stopped the leaks, the next test involved a scale stand-in model (a Playmobile figure) to start at the top of the slide and move down the slide with the flowing water from the pitcher and end in the shallow pool. Several iterations followed as the figure was stuck at the top of the slide or became stuck as it moved down the slide.

The students persevered until the plastic figure completed a transit of the waterslide on three separate trial runs. Success! But now could this be built in the backyard of one of the students? A site was chosen, and the student brought in pictures of where the waterslide Dan's Blogwas to be lodged. Unfortunately, the nature of the incline and the lighting at the time the photos were taken made it difficult to visualize how the waterslide was going to work in that area. There was also the matter of potential environmental issues if the area was going to be dug up and subjected to inordinary amounts of water and foot traffic. The students and the teacher decided that a trip to the proposed waterslide site was warranted.

The class set off a bright and cold February morning to the house of one the students. There, we were welcomed into the student’s home by her mother who gave us a brief tour, including a visit with the resident velvety soft rabbit and working cat. Once in the backyard, we walked the terrain upon which the student had done some preliminary clearing. This made it easy for us to measure the length of the hill (90 feet) and take some Dan's Blogsoil and leaf samples for analysis after February break. We returned to the house to warm ourselves with some freshly baked cinnamon bread. We said our goodbyes to the bunny, the cat, and mom, and returned to the school.

In the best tradition of engineering, the students now have new questions: will the results of the soil and leaf testing be in favor of construction? How much it will cost to build a 90-foot waterslide? How much water pressure do you need to move a person from the top to the bottom? What happens to all that water in the pool at the end of the waterslide? Will Mom and Dad really want to build a 90-foot waterslide in their backyard? Fortunately for the students, engineering is an iterative process, so a “no” at any of those points does not necessarily mean the project needs to be cancelled, only reimagined.

         

Homework

What’s Homework Got To Do With It?

By Anna Heintz, Mrs. Kim’s PreK TA

To give homework or not to give homework? That is the question. Many school districts across the country are asking this very question, and they are finding that the answer is not that easy! There are many educators who believe that homework fosters responsibility and creates space outside of school for students to extend their learning by being challenged to dive deeper in content areas. While this sounds good, there are many educators who believe that homework only extends the work day for students and creates more problems than it’s worth. 

According to an article dated September 27, 2017, entitled 6 of the Most Engaging Homework Alternatives You’ll Find, (https://www.wabisabilearning.com/blog/6-engaging-homework-alternatives), educators argue that homework is not an either-or problem, but rather there is in fact a third option. In her book Fires in the Mind, Kathleen Cushman Book coverprovides the reader with six characteristics that all homework assignments should contain. Her work is research-based and includes her firsthand interactions with school-aged children.  These characteristics are as follows:

 

  • Purpose—It should have a goal, and not just be busywork.
  • Differentiation—Everyone is at a different level and assigning the same thing to everyone is not helpful.
  • Attention and focus—Doing assignments at home when kids are tired, perhaps from after-school sports or music, is not the best time.
  • Repetition and rehearsal—These are mainstays of sports and music regimens and should be with other subjects.
  • Careful timing/proper scaffolding/sequence—Do not give homework at the very end of a semester “just to get grades in.
  • Deliberate practice—This should be intended to lead to new skills. Don’t grade homework.
Blog, Student Council

Student Government – A Dream Come True

By Liz MacDavitt, 3/4th grade teacher

I have learned a lot in my seven years as a teacher at NSCS. Most of what I’ve learned has been from watching my students be bold, daring, and confident. I have seen countless students ask big questions, persevere through challenges, and dream without limits. In these moments, the students truly have become the teacher!

I’ve always enjoyed teaching students in 3rd and 4th grade about government and politics. I’ve been interested in government and politics from a young age, and I grew up participating in Student Government activities in school. I once had big dreams of working for the US Government, but felt a stronger call of teaching on my life. I’ve been delighted year after year to share this passion with my students in the classroom, and my hope has always been that students will share in this passion with me. 

It seemed as if my dreams were coming true when a student approached Mrs. Heintz with the idea for starting a Student Government on the Beverly Campus last winter. This student asked me to advise, along with Mrs. Heintz, and admitted that some of this interest was born out of studying government in my class. We worked tirelessly last winter and spring to flush out this idea and make a concrete plan for putting it into practice. Students in grades 3-8 would be able to run for President and Vice President, by formally submitting an application and participating in an interview with the Faculty Advisors. President and Vice President elections were held in late May, and Class Representative elections were held this October. Candidates prepared speeches and campaigned by hanging posters, making buttons, and meeting with prospective voters – their peers. As a result, we have elected a team of eight students and appointed two faculty advisors to participate in the first ever Student Government on the Beverly Campus!

President Daniel Gardner (grade 5) and Vice President Emma Hickey (grade 6) had the opportunity to meet with Massachusetts State Representative Jerry Parisella (of Beverly) early this fall. Daniel and Emma sought advice from Mr. Parisella about how our school’s Student Government could serve the Beverly community. Next week, Student Government members will be removing Veteran’s Day flags from the North Beverly Cemetery, right behind our school. In the spring, we plan to partner with community members for an Earth Day cleanup project around  public places like parks and beaches in Beverly. These are just two examples of community service projects in which we plan to be involved. This group of young leaders is excited to serve!

Not only is this a dream come true for me, but also for the students involved, too. At our first Student Government meeting of this school year, President Daniel Gardner shared the following: “This is super amazing. I never thought this would be like this. Looking around at everyone, I’m just really happy. I can’t believe this just started as an idea. I think God really wanted me to do this. I felt like this school needed something special like this.” I wholeheartedly agree with Daniel and I wait in anxious anticipation of what awesome things we’ll see God do through this new program. The excitement and eagerness flows like a mighty river during our meetings, as we brainstorm ways we can work together to improve our school and community. I know we’ll keep asking big questions of God and each other, persevere through challenges that come as we grow and learn together, and continue to dream big things for our school and greater community. Stay tuned for an amazing year of Student Government projects, and keep dreaming with us!

 

 

How to Build Reading into Everyday

Wouldn’t it be great if every child loved to curl up and get lost in a great book for hours every day? Unfortunately, that is not the reality that many parents face, especially given the technology and devices that vie for young children’s’ attention. Some parents face an uphill battle to get their children to read, so we have compiled some ideas that may help you get in extra reading throughout the day.

  • Travel Time – If you, like many families, find yourself in the car driving to and from school, activities, and sports, you know that “car time” can add up quickly from minutes to hours each week. Keep a book in the car for those trips, even if it is a joke book, graphic novel, or an adventure magazine. Each time in the car can be added minutes of reading every day.
  • Use Simple Reading Moments – Sneak in reading moments when your child doesn’t even realize it. For example, try reading recipes, street signs, comics, the closed captioning on the t.v., and even the back of cereal boxes.
  • Use Tech – Try using the technology that children love, including reading tablets, books on tape (or something equivalent), and reading apps that can easily be put on a phone or tablet.
  • Bedtime – This is one of our favorite times to read because it allows for relaxation and a connection between readers. Aim for at least 20 minutes every night.
  • Play Games – Who does love to play games, especially the more interactive ones that are out currently? Games almost always require reading of some sort from the directions to the game’s cards! Every little bit counts.
  • Produce a Play – Depending upon the age and interest of your children, you could produce a short skit or play by writing out the lines and then practicing them. Make a video of it to send to family members!

Reading should not be boring or a chore, and it doesn’t have to be if you make it interesting. Be sure to always choose books that match your child’s skill level and interests. Check back in future blogs about making reading a part of your daily routine.

NSCS Lynn Campus Celebration of Learning

On the beautiful spring evening of May 4, 2018, we celebrated with our students the culmination of all their months of hard work and study. This annual “Celebration of Learning” included a live auction, classroom presentations by students, and an art show. The students proudly presented their work and took such ownership over their learning. They truly are growing spiritually and academically every day.

Our special evening kicked off in the multipurpose room where Mrs. Renee Southard was our auctioneer extraordinaire. Works of art planned and created by our very own students and teachers were the centerpieces of the auction. The artwork, made with love, included: a lacquered coffee table, hand-painted stoneware, planting pottery, canvas paintings, a stepping stone, a photo collage, wall hanging, a fleece blanket, and an “I Believe” book. The items will be cherished by our winning bidders. 

 

After the successful auction, parents, grandparents, and family members joined their students in their respective classrooms where they had the opportunity to explore what each grade has been studying. Each grade level offered a variety of events, from presentations, to theater, and even a Wax Museum! They worked so hard and had so much fun planning and preparing for these final projects. Here is a quick recap of some of the classrooms in case you couldn’t get to them all.

 

  • Rainforest Theme, complete with a living rainforest from the underbrush up through the canopy!
  • Reader’s Theater and Music Room Presentations
  • Meet the Authors and Readers Theater – The Cat in the Hat
  • Immigration Country Research Projects
  • Wax Museum Presentations
  • State Projects Presentations
  • Persuasive Presentations

 

Throughout the evening, students had the opportunity to showcase some amazing artwork that was displayed around the school, in classrooms, and adorning the walls of the hallways. Here is just a sampling of the types of work the students completed.

 

  • Landscape paintings that explored the tints and shades that can be used to create depth in a painting.
  • An analysis of the illustrations in publications such as Snowmen at Night by Mark Buehner.
  • An exploration of printmaking after studying the work of Albrecht Durer.
  • Simple pinch pots were designed and displayed proudly by our kindergarteners.
  • Traditional Korean masks used in theater productions were created by our first graders.
  • A study and compilation on traditional mosaics. The students created their own in the image of Mona Lisa.
  • Third graders “upcycled” and created weaved items out of recycled plastic.
  • Clay Fairy homes were created by our fourth graders. They incorporated interesting forms and textures.
  • Notan designs were created by fifth graders who studied the balance of light and dark in design.
  • Our middle school students curated their own show by choosing which pieces they were most proud of and displaying them with an artists statement.

Thank you so much to all the parents and family members who spent their time celebrating learning with your students. We are so proud of each and every one of them.